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Friday, December 31, 2010

What is DVI Port

What is DVI Port

DVI Port (DVI stands for (D)igital (V)ideo (I)nterface)
DVI is a new form of video interface technology made to maximize the quality of flat panel LCD monitors and high-end video graphics cards. It is a replacement for the P&D Plug & Display standard, and a step up from the digital-only DFP format for older flat panels. DVI is becoming increasingly popular with video card manufacturers, and most cards purchased include both a VGA and a DVI output port.

DVI Formats
There three types of DVI connections:
1. DVI-D (Digital)
2. DVI-A (Analog)
3. DVI-I (Integrated Digital/Analog)
DVI-D (True Digital Video)
DVI-D format is used for direct digital connections between source video (namely, video cards) and digital LCD (or rare CRD) monitors. This provides a faster, higher-quality image than with analog, due to the nature of the digital format. All video cards initially produce a digital video signal, which is converted into analog at the VGA output. The analog signal travels to the monitor and is re-converted back into a digital signal. DVI-D eliminates the analog conversion process and improves the connection between source and display.

DVI-A (High-Res Analog)
DVI-A format is used to carry a DVI signal to an analog display, such as a CRD monitor or and HDTV. Although some signal quality is lost from the digital to analog conversion, it still transmits a higher quality picture than standard VGA.

DVI-I (The Best of Both Worlds)
DVI-I format is an integrated cable which is capable of transmitting either a digital-to-digital signal or an analog-to-analog signal, but it will not work transmitting a digital-to-analog or analog-to-digital signal.
Like any other format, DVI digital and analog formats are non- interchangeable. This means that a DVI-D cable will not work on an analog system, nor a DVI-A on a digital system. Make sure that you know what format each part of your equipment is before you purchase any DVI cables. Only equipment with a DVI port labeled 'DVI-I' will accept both a DVI-D and DVI-A source signal.

NOTE: Many manufacturers will use DVI ports with all available pin holes open. This does not mean that the port is DVI-I. It is a precautionary measure to prevent pins breaking off if the wrong type of cable is inserted. Verify the DVI format of the port from the label, manual, or manufacturer.

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